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Keyword: Lily Allen

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19 Different Types of Magnolia Trees for Your Garden

Magnolia, a classic garden tree, is well-known for its grace and elegance. Its large, leathery leaves and stunning pink, purple, yellow, or white blooms make it a prized possession for a gardener. The brightly hued blossoms appear in early spring even before the leaves emerge after bearing the frosty winter. The flowers also produce a […]

21 Different Types of Colorful Daisies for Your Garden

Daisy a as we hear the name, the first picture that comes to our mind is the innocent, pure white flower with a bright yellow center. The term aDaisya is derived from an Anglo- Saxon term, which translates to adayas eyea. They open their flowery eyes at first sight of the sun in the morning, […]

40 Different Types of Hostas with Pictures

Hostas or plantain lilies are long-lasting perennials that love the shade.Their beautiful leaves, low-maintenance and resilience to harsh weather have made them a favorite with gardeners. Though they are not grown for their flowers, there are flowering and fragrant varieties that would charm you with their looks and smells. The plants come in a variety […]

Chestnut Rose

Cold Hardiness: Through zone 5 Image Source: Iv8.038.myftpupload.com, Vbelleblog.com, Gardensonline.com.au, Discoverlife.org, S.hdnux.com, I.pinimg.com

Wood Lily

Image Source: Prairiemoon.com, Petpoisonhelpline.com, I1.treknature.com, Static.inaturalist.org, First-nature.com, I.pinimg.com

Turkas Cap

Image Source: Npsot.org, Bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com, Neilsperry.com, Dallasgardendirt.files.wordpress.com, Gannett-cdn.com

Toad Lily

Cold Hardiness: Through zone 4 Image Source: Visitshipshewana.org, Dodge.extension.wisc.edu, S3.amazonaws.com, Gardencentrekoeman.co.uk, Gardenvarietynews.files.wordpress.com

Tiger Lily

Cold Hardiness: Through zone 4 Image Source: Bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com, Conservancy.bc.ca, Images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com, Gardeningknowhow.com, Upload.wikimedia.org, Thetimes.co.uk

Sweet Briar Rose

Image Credits: I.pinimg.com, Santafebotanicalgarden.org, Worldoffloweringplants.com, Chewvalleytrees.co.uk, Images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com

Rugosa Rose

Cold Hardiness: Through zone 2 Image Source: Gardenia.net, Bio.brandeis.edu, I.pinimg.com, Theeasygarden.com, Glebefarmhedging.co.uk

Death From Above 1979 a aDonat Stop Believin'a (Journey Cover)

Toronto dance-punk duo Death From Above 1979 have covered Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin'” for Amazon Music. “We made a kind of witchy version of the song that would make Steve Perry magically join Journey again,” the band wrote on Twitter. If you’re an Amazon Music subscriber, you can check it out below.


Low Life a aAgony & XTCa

The Sydney, Australia-based band Low Life have announced a new album, From Squats To Lots: The Agony And XTC Of Low Life, the follow-up to their 2019 album Downer Edn. Today, they’re releasing the album’s lead single, “Agony & XTC,” an energetic and pummeling scrawl. Check out a music video for the track below.


Watch Joyce Manor Cover My Chemical Romanceas aHelenaa At Riot Fest

Joyce Manor played the opening night of Riot Fest in Chicago on Thursday night and they broke out a cover of My Chemical Romance’s Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge anthem “Helena.” Seems like a match made in heaven!


Stream Soul Blindas New Third Chain EP

A few weeks ago, the Hudson Valley band Soul Blind introduced their new EP Third Chain with its zoned-out title track, which channeled some serious ’90s grunge energy. There’s more where that came from on the other two tracks of the EP, “Misplaced” and “Phantom Pool,” both of which are out now. Expect disaffected vocals and monster riffs, buried in an appropriate amount of muck.


Snarls a aFixed Geara

Columbus indie-pop Band To Watch Snarls are following up their 2020 debut Burst with What About Flowers?, a new EP recorded in Seattle and produced by former Death Cab For Cutie guitarist Chris Walla. “We had time to stew on this new aura our band has for this release. We have entirely new musical influences, and working with Chris Walla — thatas when it hit me that weare in a band,” singer Chlo White says.


Beverly Glenn-Copeland Announces Keyboard Fantasies Reimagined Feat. Bon Iver & Flock Of Dimes, Blood Orange, Arca, & More

Transgressive reissued Beverly Glenn-Copeland’s pioneering 1986 album Keyboard Fantasies earlier this year. And now, the trans Canadian-American artist has announced Keyboard Fantasies Reimagined, a collection of remixes and covers featuring musicians like Bon Iver and Flock Of Dimes, Blood Orange, Arca, and Julia Holter.


Couplet a aOld Elbaa

Couplet is a new project from Tanner Jones, formerly of Florida emo heroes You Blew It!, plus Adam Beck and Evan Weiss of Into It. Over It. They’re billing it quite knowingly as a “synth pivot,” and yes, it does sound like Jones has traded out his guitars for keyboards. In fact, “Old Elba,” the new single out today, reminds me of the Postal Service, the ultimate sensitive-indie-guy-goes-synthpop project.


Far Behind On Candleboxas Career? This Interview Will Catch You Up.

Starting out in the early-’90s grunge scene, Candlebox lead singer Kevin Martin didn’t feel like a soon-to-be rock star. “I wasn’t living the lifestyle of the other Seattle musicians,” he tells me over Zoom from his home in Los Angeles. “I wasn’t a bike messenger like [Pearl Jam’s] Jeff Ament was, and I didn’t work at a coffee shop like half the other musicians in Seattle did. I worked at a shoe store. Then I went and worked at a really nice shoe store and I had to wear suits and nice shoes and stuff.”


Nothing a aLa La Means I Love Youa (The Delfonics Cover)

Next month, Nothing are releasing The Great Dismal B-Sides, which is exactly what it sounds like: a collection of tracks recorded during the sessions for the Philadelphia heavy-music-to-shoegaze band’s 2020 album The Great Dismal. Last month, they shared the new song “Amber Gambler.” Today, they’re sharing another track, a cover of the Delfonics’ 1968 soul classic “La-La (Means I Love You).” Frontman Domenic Palermo says:


Weave Got A File On You: Billy Idol

Weave Got A File On You features interviews in which artists share the stories behind the extracurricular activities that dot their careers: acting gigs, guest appearances, random internet ephemera, etc.


Post Maloneas Posty Fest Has Megan Thee Stallion, Lil Uzi Vert, Turnstile, More

Like a few other big stars, Post Malone has his own festival. In 2018 and 2019, Posty headlined versions of his own Posty Fest. This year, he’s bringing it back and making it bigger. The 2021 edition of Posty Fest is coming to the area outside AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas this month. Unlike previous years, this one is spread over two days, running 10/30-31. The lineup is a weird one.


Stream Demersalas Majestically Brutal Screamo EP Death Routines

Right now, there’s so much good screamo coming out that it’s hard to keep all these bands straight, but I’m here to tell you that you should make some room for the Danish band Demersal. Demersal has been around for a few years now; they released an EP in 2017 and a full-length last year. A few months ago, Demersal and fellow Danish screamo band Regarding Ambiguity dropped a split that really impressed us. Today, Demersal have followed that with a new EP called Death Routines, and it kicks serious amounts of ass.


Amaarae a aSAD GIRLZ LUV MONEY (Remix)a (Feat. Kali Uchis)

The Ghanaian-American pop singer and producer Amaarae released her excellent The Angel You Don’t Know last fall. Now, after returning to the stage for the first time in two years with an exultant, organic performance at Pitchfork Music Festival last Saturday, she’s back with a high-profile remix of one of her album’s most memorable songs. The ascendant Colombian-American pop star Kali Uchis has hopped on a new version of the wispy and whispery yet hard-thumping “SAD GIRLZ LUV MONEY,” turning it into a bilingual linkup between African and Latin pop scenes. Listen below.


Pillow Queens a aRatsa

Fuzzed-up, sincere Dublin indie rockers Pillow Queens self-released their debut album In Waiting last year. Since then, they’ve covered the Cranberries, played on American TV, and become a Stereogum Band To Watch. Today, Pillow Queens announce that they’ve signed with Royal Mountain Records, and they’ve also dropped a new single. It rocks, and so does its video.


The Month In Hardcore: September 2021


Scarface Got A New Kidney From His Son

Last year, the pioneering Houston rapper Scarface became one of the first celebrities to go public about his battle with COVID-19. In interviews last year, Scarface said that he felt like he was going to die while in the hospital, and he also said that his fight wasn’t over. In an Instagram Live conversation, Scarface told his old friend Ludacris last March, “Iam not out the woods yet. My kidneys failing. Iam going to have to get a transplant, and then go on dialysis or whatever.” By October, Scarface was actually asking for kidney donors on Twitter. But now, it looks like Scarface has had a successful kidney transplant surgery, and he got his new kidney from his son.


Watch The Trailer For New Karen Dalton Documentary In My Own Time

Karen Dalton, the extremely talented folk blues singer who left Oklahoma and became a major part of the growing Greenwich Village folk scene in New York City in the ’60s, only released two albums before fading into obscurity and eventually dying of AIDS at 55. Contemporaries like Bob Dylan have long championed Dalton’s work, and she’s now the subject of the new documentary Karen Dalton: In My Own Time, directed by Robert Yapkowitz and Richard Peete and executive produced by Wim Wenders.


Stream Pa Salieuas New EP Afrikan Rebel

Last year, the Gambian-born UK rapper Pa Salieu released his deeply impressive debut mixtape Send Them To Coventry. Salieu’s ascent was quick and dramatic. He started out recording in his friend’s home studio, and he released his first single a few months after being shot in the head. In the time since that first mixtape came out Salieu has collaborated with slowthai, Protje, and Popcaan. Salieu also made a dramatic American TV debut on The Tonight Show earlier this year. He’s made a name for himself. Now, he’s followed up that full-length debut with a new three-song EP called Afrikan Rebel.


Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds a aEarthlingsa

Last month Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds announced B-Sides & Rarities: Part II, a sequel to their beloved B-Sides & Rarities compilation that picks up in 2005, where that one left off. Upon announcing the comp they shared “Vortex,” a previously unreleased tracking dating to 2006. Today they’ve got another one from the archives, a haunting ballad called “Earthlings” from 2018-2019 that, according to Cave, “some consider the finest track of the Ghosteen sessions.” He calls it “the missing link that binds Ghosteen together. A lovely song that just got away…” Listen below.


Keyword Selected: Allen

Legal Research Reports:

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Children's Online Privacy and Data Protection

This report surveys how selected countries from the European Union (EU) and the laws of the European Union (EU) itself provide privacy rights for children online. The EU introduced the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in 2016. As a regulation, the GDPR is directly applicable in all Member States, but most Member States have introduced legislation to ensure consistency and compliance with the GDPR in their domestic laws. France, Denmark Germany, Greece, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, and the UK have introduced legislation that serves to implement or codify the GDPR in the country’s domestic legislation. (Apr. 2021)

 


Legal Research Reports: Recognition of Foreign Passports

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Recognition of Foreign Passports. 

This report covers the recognition of foreign passport and issuance of passports or other travel documents to foreigners in 20 selected jurisdictions around the globe, and the United States. The United States is included for comparative purposes and for the general information of our readers. In addition, the report includes a section on international law pertaining to the right to leave and re-enter one’s home country, as well as international obligations to issue travel documents to refugees and stateless persons. (April 2021)

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 

 


Legal Research Reports: Citizenship Through International Adoption

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Citizenship Through International Adoption.  

This report surveys acquisition of citizenship through international adoption in 18 countries around the globe. It provides a general overview about the main legislative instruments governing international adoption and acquisition of citizenship in each of the surveyed countries. The report shows that, in most of the surveyed countries, citizenship laws are the main piece of legislation governing the acquisition of citizenship through intercountry adoption. The report sheds light on the required process and procedures of adoption in the surveyed countries. 

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 


Legal Research Reports: Taxation of Cryptocurrency Block Rewards

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Taxation of Cryptocurrency Block Rewards. 

This report surveys the tax treatment of new tokens obtained by cryptocurrency mining or staking, often known as “block rewards,” in 31 countries around the globe. It also addresses the tax implications of cryptocurrency tokens acquired through airdrops and hard forks (also referred to as a “chain split”) in various jurisdictions. This report complements a broader comparative study on regulatory approaches to cryptoassets, including the application of tax laws to cryptocurrency activities.

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 


Legal Research Reports: Israel: Regulation of COVID-19 Digital Contact Tracing

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Israel: Regulation of COVID-19 Digital Contact Tracing.

Israel’s Ministry of Health (MOH) has been conducting contact tracing in an effort to reduce the spread of the coronavirus pandemic. Tracing has involved questioning diagnosed patients, using tracing technology via a voluntary app, and surveillance by the Israel Security Service (ISA) without the consent of those observed. Surveillance of civilians for the purpose of epidemiological examination is normally outside the scope in which the ISA is authorized to operate and constitutes a serious challenge to the right to privacy and to patients’ rights. The assistance provided by the ISA to the MOH is therefore regulated under temporary special legislation that defines the scope, procedure, and duration of the activity, while addressing the constitutional challenges associated with it.

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 


Legal Research Reports: Responses to COVID-19 in the United States

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Responses to COVID-19 in the United States.

Read our updated report on U.S. federal, state, and local government responses to COVID-19. This report discusses the Congressional legislative response to the pandemic, a summary of responses by the executive branches of federal and state governments, and a summary of responses by local governments.

On November 19, starting at 2:00 PM EST, join Senior Foreign Law Specialist, Eduardo Soares, who will moderate a discussion alongside fellow foreign law specialists about several Law Library of Congress reports, including this one, for a new entry in the Foreign and Comparative Law Webinar Series titled: “Review of Recently Published Law Library Research Reports.” To register, please visit our Eventbrite page.

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 

 


Legal Research Reports: Civic Space Legal Framework

ADDENDUM: This GovDelivery notice is a correction to the one sent prior which had an incorrect title and link. 

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Civic Space Legal Framework.

This report surveys the legal framework of civic space in Brazil, Finland, Morocco, and Tunisia. Civic space protections include the right to access government information, freedom of expression, freedom of assembly, freedom of association, the right to privacy and data protection, and freedom of the press. (Oct. 2020)

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 


Legal Research Reports: Civil Space Legal Framework

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Civil Space Legal Framework.

This report surveys the legal framework of civic space in Brazil, Finland, Morocco, and Tunisia. Civic space protections include the right to access government information, freedom of expression, freedom of assembly, freedom of association, the right to privacy and data protection, and freedom of the press. (Oct. 2020)

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 


Legal Research Reports: Virtual Civil Trials

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Virtual Civil Trials.

This report surveys the law of 25 foreign jurisdictions on the availability and functioning of virtual civil hearings and/or trials, including the structure of civil court systems and arrangements made to ensure the continuation of hearings and proceedings during the COVID-19 pandemic. The report describes foreign court systems that have adopted a range of options and procedural conditions for virtual hearings and/or trials in noncriminal cases in each jurisdiction surveyed. 

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 


Legal Research Reports: Federal and State Executive Responses to COVID-19

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Federal and State Executive Responses to COVID-19.

Although emergency rule-making has been used in response to previous emergent situations, the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in emergency rule-making affecting every jurisdiction in the United States. The functional effects of emergency rule-making are wide-ranging and can be contentious. The nature of emergency rule-making creates difficulties for oversight at both the federal and state level. The rules and regulations enacted under the emergency framework will shape current and future generations as the United States begins to recover from COVID-19's economic and societal impacts. 

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 


Legal Research Reports: Regulation of Wild Animals Wet Markets

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Regulation of Wild Animals Wet Markets. 

This report examines the regulation of “wet markets,” where wild animals or the meat of such animals can be purchased for human consumption. It covers 28 jurisdictions around the world, with a particular focus on sanitary requirements for such markets and the legality of trading in wild animals or wild meat. Wet markets and other types of local or traditional food markets exist in countries around the world and are an important source of food and livelihood for many people. However, they have also been identified as potential or likely sources of outbreaks of diseases or infections that are transmissible from animals to humans, including most recently COVID-19.

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 


Legal Research Reports: Civic Education Models

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Civic Education Models.

This report surveys the models of civic education employed by the education systems of 22 selected jurisdictions around the globe. Most of the surveyed jurisdictions have included in their curricula for Grades 1 through 12 at least one course that features civic education components. Some jurisdictions have introduced special assessment models for testing students’ civics-related skills. The surveyed jurisdictions have varying standards on the training that teachers of civic education courses must receive.

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 


Celebrating Independence Day

Friends,

I hope that you are doing well. As we enter into July, it is hard to believe the many changes and challenges we’ve had to face in our world in just the past few months. The upcoming July 4th holiday is another reminder of the ways we’ve all had to adjust and rework communal celebrations and gatherings in the age of COVID-19.

Many of you have celebrated birthdays and graduations virtually, and have come up with creative ways to stay in touch with family and friends from a distance. The Library of Congress is no different, and we continue to adapt to stay connected with you even as our doors remain closed. This is especially important as we strive to offer a safe place to have difficult conversations about the challenges facing our nation today with regard to race, inequality and social justice.

To that end, below you will find information on some of our upcoming virtual events including today’s conversation with new Kluge Prize winner, Danielle Allen, who will take on the hard questions about democracy and public life. Our online series, “Hear You, Hear Me”: Conversations on Race in America, also continues this month.

You can also learn more about the major collections work we are undertaking to document the pandemic in an informative new blog post, “How Will We Remember COVID-19?”

And, as we prepare to celebrate Independence Day, it must be noted that the Library of Congress is home to the original rough draft of the Declaration of Independence. It is one of the institution’s top treasures. View it online here, https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/tr00.html, and discover other resources related to our nation’s independence below.

Have a safe holiday weekend.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


[Detail] Currier & Ives print showing the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
loc.gov/resource/pga.08583/

Independence Day

American Treasures of the Library of Congress: Declaration of Independence
loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/tr00.html

Declaration of Independence: Primary Documents in American History
guides.loc.gov/declaration-of-independence

American Revolution: A Resource Guide
guides.loc.gov/american-revolution

Thomas Jefferson Papers Collection
loc.gov/collections/thomas-jefferson-papers/about-this-collection/


TODAY: Kluge Prize Winner Danielle Allen

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced last week that Danielle Allen, director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics and the James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard University, will receive the 2020 John W. Kluge Prize for Achievement in the Study of Humanity. Allen will work with the Library to share her expertise on justice, citizenship and democracy with a wide audience.

Today at 7 p.m. ET join Allen and Kluge Center Director John Haskell for a virtual event: “Danielle Allen Takes on the Hard Questions about Democracy and Public Life.” This presentation will premiere with closed captions on both the Library's Facebook page and the Library's YouTube site and be available afterwards on the Library's video page.

Kluge Prize Announcement: loc.gov/item/prn-20-043/


Homegrown at Home Concert Series

The American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress is presenting traditional music and dance from a variety of folk cultures thriving in the United States and around the world in a new online concert series each Wednesday through September. Tune in to “Homegrown at Home” Wednesdays at noon ET on the American Folklife Center Facebook page, and replay performances anytime on the Library of Congress YouTube channel and on the Library's video page.

Series info & schedule: loc.gov/item/prn-20-045/


"Hear You, Hear Me": Conversations on Race in America

This online series continues featuring Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden in conversation with some of the nation’s great literary figures, and will highlight what poetry and literature can offer the nation as it contends with foundational issues of social justice.

  • Joy Harjo and Tracy K. Smith - Thursday, July 9, 2020, 7-8 p.m. ET
  • Colson Whitehead - Thursday, July 16, 2020, 7-8 p.m. ET

Event details & videos: loc.gov/programs/national-book-festival/national-book-festival-presents/


[Detail] Life during the pandemic. Photo: Camilo Vergara. Prints and Photographs Division.

How Will We Remember COVID-19?

The Library is amassing a vast collection of materials that document the COVID-19 pandemic, including the award-winning photography of Camilo Vergara. These photographs are among the very first items the Library acquired documenting the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic. And they will be far from the last: The Library anticipates a collecting effort that exceeds its coverage of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks — which was huge.

Read the full blog post: blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/06/how-will-we-remember-covid-19/


Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 


Legal Research Reports: Regulating Electronic Means to Fight the Spread of COVID-19

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Regulating Electronic Means to Fight the Spread of COVID-19

Countries have to find ways to control and mitigate the spread of COVID-19 in order to break the chain of human-to-human transmission, such as case identification, isolation, testing, contact tracing, quarantine, and location tracking. Many governments have turned to electronic measures to provide information to individuals about the COVID-19 pandemic, check symptoms, trace contacts and alert persons who have been in proximity to an infected person, identify “hot spots,” and track compliance with confinement measures and stay-at-home orders. Most of the surveyed jurisdictions have developed one or several dedicated coronavirus apps with different functionalities, such as general information and advice about COVID-19, symptom checkers, and contact tracing and warning. This report surveys the regulation of electronic means to fight the spread of this infectious disease in 23 selected jurisdictions around the globe. 

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports.


Celebrating Juneteenth & More

Friends,

Today is Juneteenth, thought to be the longest running celebration of the end of slavery in the United States. On June 19, 1865, notice of the Emancipation Proclamation freeing enslaved people finally reached Texas through an order read aloud by Union General Gordon Grange in Galveston. The word arrived a whopping two and a half years late. Abraham Lincoln’s initial draft of the Emancipation Proclamation is among the treasures contained in the Manuscript Division at the Library of Congress, and is viewable online here. www.loc.gov/exhibits/civil-war-in-america/december-1862-october-1863.html#obj4

In fact, the Library plays host to a wealth of resources and materials related to the emancipation holiday and its celebration throughout American history, as well to the practice of slavery itself and to the voices of formerly enslaved people. Below you will find a list of new blog posts from throughout the Library highlighting a few such resources, including audio recordings from our poignant collection, “Voices Remembering Slavery: Freed People Tell Their Stories.” Other materials are being shared on our social media accounts throughout the day.

This year’s Juneteenth celebrations have special significance and poignancy in today’s climate where issues of racial injustice are again at the forefront. , I am hosting a virtual conversation with current National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature Jason Reynolds and former National Ambassador Jacqueline Woodson about ways to hear and support kids during a period of nationwide protest against injustice. This event is part of our new online series "Hear You, Hear Me: Conversations on Race in America," which you can also learn more about below. You can watch it on our Facebook page, our YouTube channel or on our main website at loc.gov. I hope to “see” you there.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


Juneteenth-Related Posts from Across the Library's Blogs

The Birth of Juneteenth; Voices of the Enslaved

Ralph Ellison’s “Juneteenth"
blogs.loc.gov/catbird/2020/06/ralph-ellisons-juneteenth/a

Born in Slavery: Portraits and Narratives of Formerly Enslaved People
blogs.loc.gov/picturethis/2020/06/born-in-slavery-portraits-and-narratives-of-formerly-enslaved-people/

Becky Elzy and Alberta Bradford: Spiritual Folklorists
blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2018/02/becky-elzy-and-alberta-bradford-spiritual-folklorists/

When a Former Enslaved Person Debated a Former Confederate in the House of Representatives
blogs.loc.gov/law/2020/06/when-a-former-slave-debated-a-former-confederate-in-the-house-of-representatives/


“Hear You, Hear Me”: Conversations on Race in America

This new online series features Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden in conversation with some of the nation’s great literary figures, and will highlight what poetry and literature can offer the nation as it contends with foundational issues of social justice.

  • Jason Reynolds and Jacqueline Woodson: TODAY, June 19, 4-5 p.m. ET
  • Joy Harjo and Tracy K. Smith: Thursday, July 9, 7-8 p.m. ET
  • Colson Whitehead: Thursday, July 16, 7-8 p.m. ET

All of the conversations will be available for viewing after the launch.

Event details: blogs.loc.gov/national-book-festival/2020/06/hear-you-hear-me-virtual-programs-feature-conversations-on-race-in-america/
Videos: loc.gov/programs/national-book-festival/national-book-festival-presents/


The Boccaccio Project: Concerts in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic

Watch as the Library premieres as series of 10 commissions of new music from composers across America in The Boccaccio Project, inspired by a similar literary effort in the mid-14th century by Giovanni Boccaccio.

Watch as each concert premieres nightly at 8 p.m.June 15-26, or watch the full series: 
loc.gov/concerts/boccaccio-project/


Latest LCM Commemorates the End of World War II

In the new issue of the Library of Congress Magazine, we commemorate the 75th anniversary of end of World War II and the service of the men and women who fought in that conflict.

Features include:

  • a one-of-a-kind map, made by Japanese pilots that detailed the damage inflicted at Pearl Harbor
  • Manuscript Division collections that preserve photos taken in the field by Gen. George S. Patton
  • commentary by Pulitzer Prize-winner Rick Atkinson on a war whose consequences continue to unspool more than seven decades later

... and more. Download your copy today: loc.gov/lcm/


Save the Date! The 2020 National Book Festival is Going Virtual

The 20th Library of Congress National Book Festival will celebrate “American Ingenuity” in 2020, featuring the creativity and inspiration of some of the nation’s most gifted authors in a reimagined virtual festival the weekend of Sept. 25-27. The festival is part of the Library’s 220th anniversary year, and more details will be announced at a later date.

loc.gov/item/prn-20-039/


June Is LGBTQ Pride Month

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month and June 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of annual LGBTQ+ Pride traditions. The first Pride march in New York City was held on June 28, 1970 on the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. Primary sources available at the Library of Congress provide detailed information about how this first Pride march was planned, and the reasons why activists felt so strongly that it should exist.

loc.gov/lgbt-pride-month/


Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 


Cultural Institutions in Times of Social Unrest

Friends,

Once again, America finds itself confronting difficult questions about race and inequality.

The struggle for freedom and equality dates back to our nation’s founding, and it is possible to find context and inspiration in the words of those who have fought for a more perfect union since the beginning.

But, libraries offer more than just historical context on today’s events. They offer safe spaces to have difficult conversations about the challenges facing our nation today. They are places of welcome and respite and community. They are collectors of the stories and experiences that have brought us to this place in our nation’s history and can inspire us to persevere in our efforts to pursue that more perfect union.

Last week, I hosted one such conversation with Smithsonian Institution Secretary Lonnie Bunch to discuss the future of our cultural institutions and how we remain accessible and relevant during a period of global pandemic coupled with nationwide protests against injustice.

Lonnie Bunch reminded all of us that “there is hope in history.” So, I leave you with a quote of his from our conversation and invite you to watch it in its entirety at loc.gov/item/webcast-9194/.

"So there’s a kind of, hopefully, a tipping point where people come together and recognize that the past should give you some hope. If people could work together to found the NAACP or work together to end slavery then we can work together to begin to address this as well. So I find hope in history. Not always optimism, but I find hope in history.”

Below you will find links to information about the NAACP collection at the Library of Congress along with other examples of courage and hope that have transformed our nation.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


NAACP: A Century in the Fight for Freedom

Originally mounted in 2009 and available online, this exhibition presents a retrospective of the major personalities, events, and achievements that shaped the NAACP’s history during its first 100 years.

Founded in 1909, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. Since 1964, the Library of Congress has served as its official repository, and the NAACP Records now consist of more than five million items dating from 1909 to the present. The records encompass a wide variety of materials, including manuscripts, photographs, prints, pamphlets, broadsides, audiotapes, phonograph records, films, and video recordings. Every phase of the NAACP's many activities can be found in this rich and diverse collection.

The NAACP Records are the largest single collection ever acquired by the Library and annually the most heavily used. These records are the cornerstone of the Library’s unparalleled resources for the study of the twentieth-century civil rights movement in the U.S. that also include the original records of the National Urban League, the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, and the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, as well as the microfilmed records of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). 

loc.gov/exhibits/naacp/overview.html


 

Civil Rights History Project

On May 12, 2009, the U. S. Congress authorized a national initiative by passing The Civil Rights History Project Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-19). The law directed the Library of Congress (LOC) and the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) to conduct a national survey of existing oral history collections with relevance to the Civil Rights movement to obtain justice, freedom and equality for African Americans and to record and make widely accessible new interviews with people who participated in the struggle.

The activists interviewed for this project belong to a wide range of occupations and the video recordings of their recollections cover a wide range of topics within the freedom struggle, such as the influence of the labor movement, nonviolence and self-defense, religious faith, music, and the experiences of young activists. Actions and events discussed in the interviews include the Freedom Rides (1961), the Albany Movement (1961), the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom (1963), the Selma to Montgomery Rights March (1965), the Orangeburg Massacre (1968), the Poor People’s Campaign (1968), sit-ins, and voter registration drives in the South. The murder of fourteen year old Emmett Till in 1955, a horrific event that galvanized many young people into joining the freedom movement, looms large in the memories of many movement veterans.

loc.gov/collections/civil-rights-history-project/about-this-collection/


Rosa Parks: In Her Own Words

Rosa Parks (1913–2005) is best known for her refusal to give up her seat to a white man on a crowded bus in Montgomery, Alabama, on December 1, 1955. Her arrest sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a pivotal event in the civil rights movement that ultimately led to the dismantling of Jim Crow segregation. Rosa Parks became an icon of the movement, celebrated for this single courageous act of civil disobedience, but she is often characterized by misconceptions. Contrary to popular belief, Parks was not a demure seamstress who chose not to stand because she was physically tired. Her calm demeanor hid a militant spirit forged over decades.

Exhibition: loc.gov/exhibitions/rosa-parks-in-her-own-words/about-this-exhibition/
Blog post - "A Protestor Who Changed America": blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/06/a-protester-who-changed-america-rosa-parks/


 

Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote

This exhibition tells the story of the seventy-two-year campaign for women’s suffrage. Considered the largest reform movement in American history, its participants believed that securing the vote was essential to achieving women’s economic, social, and political equality. For years, determined women organized, lobbied, paraded, petitioned, lectured, picketed, and faced imprisonment. Their collective story is one of courage, perseverance, savvy, creativity, and hope that continues to inspire activists today.

loc.gov/exhibitions/women-fight-for-the-vote/about-this-exhibition/


June Is LGBTQ Pride Month

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month and June 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of annual LGBTQ+ Pride traditions. The first Pride march in New York City was held on June 28, 1970 on the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising. Primary sources available at the Library of Congress provide detailed information about how this first Pride march was planned, and the reasons why activists felt so strongly that it should exist.

loc.gov/lgbt-pride-month/


Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 


Memorial Day Weekend Update from the Library of Congress

Friends,

I hope that you and your families remain well this month. On Monday, we will observe Memorial Day, honoring the service and sacrifices of members of our armed forces. Our nation is strong and it endures because of the men and women who give it their all in protecting and preserving our democracy.

Since 2000, the Veterans History Project (VHP) at the Library has been committed to collecting, preserving and making accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans. And while many of the stories collected are from living veterans, there are thousands that were donated posthumously by family members looking to preserve the legacies of their loved ones. “Say Their Name. Learn Their Story” is a wonderful blog post highlighting the stories of individuals who have given their lives in service of our country, and who are memorialized in the VHP collections. Read more here: https://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2019/05/say-their-name-learn-their-story/

The Library of Congress buildings remain closed to the public, with all public events currently canceled until further notice. Visit our web site for full, up-to-date information about our response to COVID-19. In the meantime, we invite you to continue to explore our content digitally through the resources listed below, and to connect with us on our social media channels.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


Veterans History Project

Personal narratives, correspondence, and visual materials are collected and made available so that future generations may hear directly from veterans and better understand the realities of war. Learn more about this important project as well how to collect and submit veterans’ stories by visiting loc.gov/vets/.

Experiencing War: Stories from the Veterans History Project

On Friday, May 8, the Veterans History Project (VHP) commemorated the end of World War II in Europe, also known as V-E Day, by releasing a new installment of the VHP online exhibit, Experiencing War. In this new online feature, you can explore the personal stories of 15 World War II veterans and what the end of the war meant for them. 

loc.gov/item/prn-20-035/


#FolklifeArchiveChallenge

Although some cities and states are starting to open up a little, we have a feeling it will be a while before we’re going out to concerts, theaters, jams, or open mics to perform or enjoy live music and performing arts. At the Library of Congress, we have an amazing online archive of folk music and folklife which you can explore right from home, and we’d like to offer a suggestion: why not learn a song, tune, poem, or story from the archive, make a recording or video of yourself performing it, and post it online? Or make a work of art based on one of our photos, or write a story or poem based on our materials. We’d love to see what you come up with! Folks from all genres and creators of all art forms are invited to interpret a field recording, video, photo, or manuscript from the AFC Archive. You don’t need to be a professional in order to participate!

Learn more about the challenge and how to participate:
blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2020/05/spending-a-lot-of-time-at-home-take-the-archive-challenge/


Suffrage History Webinar May 27

The Library’s Janice Ruth, curator of our Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote exhibition, will join curators from the National Archives and Records Administration and the Smithsonian’s National Portait Gallery for “Curator’s Cut: An Inside Look at DC’s Suffrage Exhibits.” This free webinar is being hosted by the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission.

Register here: https://bit.ly/2TjoWow


Virtual Concert May 28

The Library of Congress and Portland Ovations will present the International Contemporary Ensemble in the Library’s first interactive digital concert – “Aural Explorations: Farrin, Fure and Messiaen” – on Thursday, May 28, at 7 p.m. Eastern time.

The concert will feature the world premiere of the Library co-commissioned composition by Suzanne Farrin titled “Nacht,” capping a season-long celebration of women composers and performers honoring the centennial of women’s suffrage. The concert will also feature a world premiere of Ashley Fure’s “Interior Listening Protocol 1” paired with Olivier Messiaen’s “Louange à l'Éternité de Jésus” for ondes Martenot and Suzanne Farrin’s “Polvere et Ombra.”

loc.gov/item/prn-20-037/


Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

May is Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Asian and Pacific Islanders who have enriched America's history and are instrumental in its future success. Visit this multi-institution web portal hosted by the Library of Congress for featured content and resources.

asianpacificheritage.gov/


Jewish American Heritage Month

May is Jewish American Heritage Month. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Jewish Americans who have helped form the fabric of American history, culture and society. Visit this multi-institution web portal hosted by the Library of Congress for featured content and resources.

jewishheritagemonth.gov/


Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 


Legal Research Reports: Israel: Scope and Duration of Amendments Regulating the Tenure and Operation of a Rotating Government

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Israel: Scope and Duration of Amendments Regulating the Tenure and Operation of a Rotating Government.

On May 7, 2020, the Knesset (Israel’s parliament) adopted legislation amending the Basic Law: The Government and the Basic Law: The Knesset to provide a legal basis for the establishment of a rotating government as an alternative form of government in Israel (Amendment Law). In addition to provisions applicable to future rotating governments, the legislation contains provisions that will exclusively apply to the upcoming 35th government.

The Amendment Law requires a majority of 70 of the 120 Members of the Knesset to amend its provisions. A last-minute amendment to provide for a four-year term for the 35th government, instead of a three-year term, contrary to provisions otherwise applicable under Basic Law: The Government, is theoretically possible. Considering the relative size of the parliamentary groups currently serving in the 23rd Knesset, obtaining the required support for such an amendment would pose a great challenge.

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 


Legal Research Reports: Virtual Civil Trials

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Virtual Civil Trials.

This report surveys the law of 25 foreign jurisdictions on the availability and functioning of virtual civil hearings and/or trials, including the structure of civil court systems and arrangements made to ensure the continuation of hearings and proceedings during the COVID-19 pandemic. The report describes foreign court systems that have adopted a range of options and procedural conditions for virtual hearings and/or trials in noncriminal cases in each jurisdiction surveyed.

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 


The Library of Congress Turns 220

Since that beginning 220 years ago, the Library has grown to become the largest library in the world with a collection of more than 170 million items that document human creativity and achievement across the centuries and around the globe.

Collecting and providing access to these collections takes on a new meaning and significance in our current world. With social distancing as the norm, and more time spent at home, we want to continue to highlight ways to connect with our content, our knowledgeable staff, and each other during these times. From April 24 to 30, you can celebrate the Library’s 220th birthday by participating in online programs from across the Library, reading themed posts on our blogs and social media channels, and downloading our brand new app to explore the Library’s digital collections from home.

The Library of Congress buildings remain closed to the public, with all public events currently canceled through July 1. Visit our web site for full, up-to-date information about our response to COVID-19. In the meantime, we invite you to our virtual birthday celebration and to continue to engage with us through some of the resources listed below. We look forward to continuing to serve you during this season and beyond.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


SPECIAL 220th BIRTHDAY VIDEO EVENTS

Citizen DJ Premiere & Virtual MasterclassFriday, April 24, 3 p.m. ET

Preview the new Citizen DJ app from Innovator-in-Residence Brian Foo, and discover how to make Hip Hop using the Library’s music collection. Presented by LC Labs.

America's Greatest Library: History of the Library of Congress
Saturday, April 25, 1 p.m. ET

Write. Right. Rite. A "Grab the Mic: Tell Your Story" video series with Jason Reynolds, National Ambassador for Young People's Literature.
Tuesday, April 28, 10:30 a.m. ET

Awareness to Action: Innovate for a Green Future
Wednesday, April 29, 11 a.m. ET

Join the U.S. Copyright Office for their next Copyright Matters lecture that will explore how creators—who through the copyright system can earn a living from their work—can play a key role in creating a vision of a green future and its untold benefits. Registration required.

Social Movement Changing America: The Legacies of the 19th Amendment
Thursday, April 30, 3:30 p.m. ET

A Law Day 2020 event presented by the Law Library of Congress and the American Bar Association. Registration required, space is limited.

Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic
Thursday, April 30, 7 p.m. ET

Prize-winning science writer David Quammen discusses his book "Spillover," in which he tracks the animal origins of human diseases through the centuries, with National Book Festival Co-Chairman David Rubenstein.

Discover more ways to engage with the Library during our birthday week and beyond:
https://www.loc.gov/engage/


Celebrate National Poetry Month with 50 Newly Available Audio Recordings

The Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature at the Library of Congress dates back to 1943 and contains nearly two thousand recordings of poets and prose writers participating in literary events at the Library’s Capitol Hill campus as well as sessions at the Library’s Recording Laboratory. New recordings added for 2020 include a 1978 reunion reading featuring 13 of our Consultants in Poetry, and Gwendolyn Brooks reading poems (including the iconic “We Real Cool”) in the Jefferson Recording Laboratory in 1961.

Visit the archive site.
Discover more on this blog post.


Try Activity Kits for the Whole Family

Encourage kids of all ages to use their creativity to complete activities inspired by the Library’s collections. With simple items found around the house and items from our website, kids can Cook Up History, Make a Mini-Book, Color Our Collections, and so much more. Visit the Resources for Family Engagement page to download activity kits and get started today.

https://www.loc.gov/families/


Join the Effort: By the People

We are grateful to all those who transcribe and review pages on the Library's virtual volunteering project By the People launched in 2018. As of the Library’s 220th birthday today, volunteers have transcribed over 125,000 pages from the papers of suffragists including Mary Church Terrell, Lucy Stone, and Susan B Anthony, civil rights activist Rosa Parks, poet Walt Whitman, President Abraham Lincoln, and many others. Once a whole item such as a journal or letter is complete, it is brought back to loc.gov where it radically improves search and discovery for patrons, and accessibility those who use screen readers.

https://crowd.loc.gov/


Preservation Week

National Preservation Week is April 26 – May 2. Preservation of the world's largest collection is accomplished through a broad range of activities distributed across the Library. Learn more about these preservation activities and the work to keep the collections available for the next 220 years and beyond.

https://www.loc.gov/preservation/


Coronavirus Updates from the Copyright Office

The Copyright Office has announced updated flexibility surrounding registration deposits and timing provisions for those affected by COVID-19 as outlined in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. Visit the Copyright Office COVID-19 page for more info.

https://www.copyright.gov/coronavirus/


Support the Library

We are more grateful than ever for all that you do to keep us strong. Whether you support the Library with a gift or simply by spreading the word about what we do, you help us in our mission to connect millions of people around the world with the stories of our collective past, present, and future.

If you haven't yet had a chance to give and you're in a position to donate, please consider making a gift at loc.gov/donate/.

 


Legal Research Reports: Child Protection Law and Policy

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Child Protection Law and Policy.

This report includes surveys of 16 foreign jurisdictions on laws and policies on protecting children from abuse and neglect. The introductory summary briefly describes domestic U.S. federal law before turning to a comparative analysis of foreign law. The individual country surveys in this report describe the law of each jurisdiction on protecting children from abuse and neglect. They also describe practices respecting data gathering and the publication of statistics, as applicable in each country.

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 


Legal Research Reports: Government Responses to Disinformation

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Government Responses to Disinformation.

Concerns regarding the impact of viral dissemination of disinformation on democratic systems of government, on political discourse, on public trust in state institutions, and on social harmony have been expressed by many around the world. This report addresses reported instances of alleged disinformation and highlights governmental responses to challenges posed by the spread of disinformation on social media platforms in 16 jurisdictions

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 


A Message from the Librarian of Congress

Friends,

I hope that you are taking care or yourselves and your families as we settle into a new normal amid the COVID-19 pandemic. During these challenging times, the Library of Congress buildings remain closed to the public with all public events currently canceled through May 11. However, while our physical doors may be closed, we are still here for you.

The Library’s vast online resources offer unlimited opportunities to discover something new for families, educators, researchers and anyone curious enough to join us.

Our dedicated and talented Library staff remain hard at work, remotely expanding online collections, cataloging, registering Copyrights and advising Congress, while also developing new virtual events and offerings that offer new ways to engage. Below you will find just a few ways that you can continue to find excellent programs and content from the Library.

Thank you for your support of the Library of Congress, and we invite you to continue to (virtually) engage with us safely at home. Visit our web site for full, up-to-date information about our response to COVID-19.

Sincerely,
Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress


Engage!

Children’s author and illustrator Dav Pilkey shares new activities and exciting videos every Friday. DETAILS: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-20-026/

Jason Reynolds, the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, shares his passion for storytelling through a new monthly GRAB THE MIC newsletter and "Write. Right. Rite.," a twice-weekly "Grab the Mic" video series. DETAILS: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-20-028/

Poets Laureate Joy Harjo, Robert Pinsky, Natasha Trethewey and Juan Felipe Herrera talk to Ron Charles of The Washington Post about "The Poetry of Home" in a series for National Poetry Month. DETAILS: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-20-029/

Find more ways to engage with authors you love and connect to the Library’s resources from anywhere in the world on this new, frequently-updated page: https://loc.gov/engage/


Rosa Parks: In Her Own Words – Visit the Exhibition Online

Visit fascinating exhibitions online including our current exhibition on Rosa Parks which showcases rarely seen materials that offer an intimate view of Rosa Parks and documents her life and activism—creating a rich opportunity for viewers to discover new dimensions to their understanding of this seminal figure.

https://www.loc.gov/exhibitions/rosa-parks-in-her-own-words/about-this-exhibition/


For Educators: Classroom Materials & Online Office Hours

The Library of Congress offers classroom materials and professional development to help teachers effectively use primary sources from the Library's vast digital collections in their teaching. https://loc.gov/teachers/

Join Library of Congress education specialists for 20-minute topical presentations followed by Q&A every Tuesday and Thursday 2-3 p.m. ET. https://loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/office-hours/


Explore Digital Collections

Dive into the Library’s digital collections to explore just about any topic imaginable. Click through historical portraits and cityscape photographs, listen to sound recordings and oral histories, study American history and world cultures, discover local history and folklife traditions, explore maps, music, manuscripts and so much more. With digitized collections of more than 2.4 million items, it’s all at your fingertips.

https://loc.gov/collections/


Coronavirus Resource Guide

This is intended as a guide to laws, regulations and executive actions in the United States, at both the federal and the state level, and in various countries with respect to the new coronavirus and its spread. It also includes links to the Library's Congressional Research Service reports that provide information to Congress about the novel coronavirus. In addition, we provide links to relevant federal agency websites.

https://blogs.loc.gov/law/2020/03/coronavirus-resource-guide/


Ask a Librarian – We’re Open for (Online) Business

Most of the Library’s reference librarians are now teleworking in response to the coronavirus pandemic. But our Ask a Librarian service remains open! Submit questions to receive research or reference help.

More: https://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2020/03/ask-a-librarian-were-open-for-online-business/­


Support the Library

Thank you for being an important part of the Library of Congress family. During these difficult times, we are more grateful than ever for your support. Your generosity helps keep us strong and allows us to be ready when crises lift. Please stay safe. Visit loc.gov/donate and consider making a gift to ensure the Library’s resources help everyone who needs them.

 


Legal Research Reports: Protection of Environmental Defenders in Latin America

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Protection of Environmental Defenders in Latin America.

This report includes surveys of laws guaranteeing the safety of environmental defenders in Latin America, especially in Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Venezuela. A United Nations Regional Agreement on Access to Information, Public Participation and Justice in Environmental Matters in Latin America and the Caribbean, which was adopted for the specific purpose of promoting, protecting, and defending human rights in environmental matters was signed by Brazil, Guatemala, and Nicaragua. However, Colombia and Honduras are the only countries that have enacted specific legislation for the protection of environmental defenders.

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 


Legal Research Reports: CORRECTION: Continuity of Legislative Activities during Emergency Situations

Previous version of this notice was sent with incorrect links. 

The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Continuity of Legislative Activities during Emergency Situations.

This reports the law of 36 foreign jurisdictions on the functioning of legislatures under emergency measures, arrangements in legislatures for a designated sub-group to constitute a kind of "emergency parliament" with devolved powers from the whole legislature, and arrangements made by national legislative bodies to ensure their work during the COVID-19 pandemic. In the vast majority of countries surveyed, legislatures have adopted preventative measures in response to the public emergency posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Meanwhile, no country surveyed has explicitly invoked the powers of an "emergency parliament" with the devolved power from the whole legislature. However, several countries surveyed give various other emergency powers to the legislature in times of emergencies. 

This report is one of many prepared by the Law Library of Congress. Visit the Comprehensive Index of Legal Reports page for a complete listing of reports and the Current Legal Topics page for our highlighted and newer reports. 

 


September News from the Library of Congress

News from the Library of Congress

2021 National Book Festival Starts Tomorrow!


June News from the Library of Congress

News from the Library of Congress

Celebrating Juneteenth, Pride Month, & More!


Take the Library of Congress Survey

Over the past year, like you, the Library of Congress has adjusted, recalibrated and learned. We want to continue to learn from you about what more we can do. As a friend of the Library of Congress, your feedback is critical to us as we look to the future. The Library of Congress is your library and we want to build plans based on YOU.

Please take a moment to complete the survey and share more about how you’ve engaged with the Library, what we can do better, and what more you want to see from us. No matter where you are in the country (or world!), or how you’ve connected with the Library before – we want your feedback.

Take the survey: https://wh.snapsurveys.com/s.asp?k=162090351735&src=1

The survey will close in 10 days, so please take 10 minutes to complete it now. We look forward to sharing the insights we learn and, most importantly, using your feedback to chart the path forward.

Thanks for your time!

Carla Hayden
Librarian of Congress


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